Birmingham to roll out ‘mobile’ HWRCs

Birmingham city council said today (15 June) it is to roll out a fleet of ‘mobile’ household waste and recycling centres (HWRCs) as part of efforts to reduce fly-tipping.

The £1.4 million initiative will see four units of mobile HWRCs introduced in areas with high rates of fly-tipping.

A demonstration mobile wagon with multiple compartments, enabling people to drop off waste for recycling by material type (picture: Birmingham city council)

Each unit which will feature three vehicles: a regular refuse collection vehicle for waste with no other use, a van for taking away items that can be reused by charities and a wagon with multiple compartments, enabling people to drop off waste for recycling by material type.

Dates for the roll out of the service will be announced soon, but the council says they will initially be deployed in areas with high fly-tipping and low take-up of the council’s paid-for bulky waste services.

During the pilot project, which represents £1.4 million of a £7.2 million investment in street scene services, each of the council’s 69 wards will receive at least one visit from a mobile HWRC in the next year. An assessment will then be carried out to decide if the scheme should continue, be modified or see other options pursued.

‘Bold’

Councillor Ian Ward, leader of Birmingham city council, said: “We’re grateful for the work done by residents to keep their areas clean, and this is all about the council doing everything it can to play its part in delivering on one of the key priorities for people in this city.

“That’s why we have assembled a bold programme of activity, supported by investment, to tackle some long-term and deep-rooted issues affecting our neighbourhoods.”

Measures

The wagon will form part of a unit including a refuse lorry and a van for taking away items that can be reused by charities (picture: Birmingham city council)

The remainder of the £7.2 million will be spent on a range of other projects to reduce fly-tipping.

This includes spending £1.6 million on additional crews to tackle properties without a wheelie bin, where fly-tipping is more of a problem.

The council has also dedicated £1 million to street-led “days of action”, which will include enforcement staff, waste removal crews and community participation.

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